SpaceX Interplanetary Spaceship Preparing for Journey to Mars

SpaceX Interplanetary Spaceship Preparing for Journey to Mars

SpaceX Interplanetary Spaceship Preparing for Journey to Mars

The Bridge

April Edition

SpaceX is preparing atmospheric tests of it’s new interplanetary spaceship as early as 2019. This marks the next big step toward a human crewed expedition to Mars. Founder Elon Musk announced that a prototype of the BFR spaceship was already under construction by a team of SpaceX engineers. The proposed multi-phased testing said to begin next year would advance from atmospheric, to space, then finally the red planet.

“We are building the first ship, the first Mars or interplanetary ship, right now, and I think we’ll probably be able to do short flights, short sort of up-and-down flights probably in the first half of next year.” 

– Elon Musk, SXSW Festival, Austin, Texas.

SpaceX Interplanetary Spaceship Preparing for Journey to Mars

– Size comparison: (left to right) Falcon 1, Falcon 9, Falcon Heavy and BFR. Credit: Space X

The BFR’s (Big Falcon Rocket) design has already been revealed, and has a substantially larger payload, thrust, and lift capacity than the world’s current most powerful launcher; the Falcon Heavy Rocket. The new design will stand at around 106 meters tall, and almost 30 meters in diameter. The booster stage boasts 31 methane-fuelled raptor engines with nearly 12 million pounds of thrust. That would make the BFR capable of delivering a payload of up to 150 metric tonnes into low-orbit with re-entry abilities.

“Most likely, it’s going to happen at our Brownsville location because we’ve got a lot of land with nobody around, so if it blows up, it’s cool.”

SpaceX’s long-term goals has always been to facilitate the colonisation of mars, the BFR may very well be on it’s way there by unmanned by 2022, and crewed by 2022; if we are to go by Musk’s optimistic schedule. Besides the prospect of interplanetary travel, the sheer size and potentially re-useability of the BFR would allow for much heavier satellites and telescopic equipment to be carried into orbit.

 

Actura.